Mad Scientist Disease

I recently had a very encouraging session. A girl whose progress had stalled out around 650 on the GMAT wanted to come in and do one session before her test. She already had the test date scheduled and wanted to at least get a sense of direction so that we could plan out her next attempt. As we worked together however, I found that her skills were excellent. She knew all of the concepts and formulas and had a strong enough math background to do very well on the test. The problem was that she had mad scientist disease.

Now mad scientist disease is a phrase I coined for someone who upon seeing a math problem erupts in a flurry of activity. Notes are scribbled, equations laid out and many important things are figured out. The problem is that many of those things are irrelevant! What the mad scientist does is largely a waste of time. She mixes together lots of chemicals and hopes that one of the compounds she finds is useful and that nothing blows up in her face!

In the one session we had before this student’s test we talked about how to approach problems. We focused on patiently organizing thinking and planning on what needed to be solved before solving anything. I got the student to slow down and relax.

Now I can’t claim that this is a typical result, but after that one session this student’s score went up to 730! An 80-point gain in a week! And all it took was a simple cure for mad scientist disease. Slow down and plan what you’re going to do before you do it.

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